Life Inspires Art and Art Inspires Life

Jan 11

hifructosemag:

Anton Marrast is a Russian illustrator and digital artist from Barcelona, Spain. His series entitled Slow Story is filled with dynamic graphic illustrations of one-eyed youthful characters making their way through intriguing and often evocative narratives. Marrast’s work is largely based on his own personal stories. For his digital work he uses Photoshop on his personal laptop otherwise he can be found drawing on paper using pens and markers, something he has been doing since a young child.

This is soooooo dope!

blackcontemporaryart:

Shikeith Cathey
“Mandingo I” 2012
Mixed Media /Digital Art Print

Same as the last post… Ya bish!!!
Jan 11

blackcontemporaryart:

Shikeith Cathey

“Mandingo I” 2012

Mixed Media /Digital Art Print

Same as the last post… Ya bish!!!

blackcontemporaryart:

Shikeith Cathey
“The Mother Load” 2009
Fine Art Print

Black Art ya bish!!!!
Jan 11

blackcontemporaryart:

Shikeith Cathey

“The Mother Load” 2009

Fine Art Print

Black Art ya bish!!!!

blackcontemporaryart:


OPP: Other People’s Property, which opens January 25, 2013, in Haverford College’s Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, is a broad survey of Thomas’ work. Curated by Kalia Brooks, former curator of the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts in Brooklyn and current adjunct professor at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, the solo show features pieces from several of Thomas’ series. Those from B®anded explore advertising language and logos, particularly those featuring African American men. Unbranded presents images from ads that were created for black audiences. Strange Fruit entwines the visual signifiers of lynching and professional sports, and Winter in America uses animated G.I. Joe figures to tell the story of Thomas’ cousin’s murder. In the many different artworks—from a framed portrait of a beatific Uncle Ben (of rice box fame) to a kitty litter ad from Ebony magazine stripped of its marketing copy—Thomas uses provocation and sly humor to help viewers understand not only their place in the consumer culture, but also how the way things are sold to us impacts how we see ourselves and others.

Image: Hank Willis Thomas, Are you the Right Kind of Woman for it?, 1974/2007

Champagne wishes and 2 white bitches (I mean it in a nice way lol)
Jan 11

blackcontemporaryart:

OPP: Other People’s Property, which opens January 25, 2013, in Haverford College’s Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, is a broad survey of Thomas’ work. Curated by Kalia Brooks, former curator of the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts in Brooklyn and current adjunct professor at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, the solo show features pieces from several of Thomas’ series. Those from B®anded explore advertising language and logos, particularly those featuring African American men. Unbranded presents images from ads that were created for black audiences. Strange Fruit entwines the visual signifiers of lynching and professional sports, and Winter in America uses animated G.I. Joe figures to tell the story of Thomas’ cousin’s murder. In the many different artworks—from a framed portrait of a beatific Uncle Ben (of rice box fame) to a kitty litter ad from Ebony magazine stripped of its marketing copy—Thomas uses provocation and sly humor to help viewers understand not only their place in the consumer culture, but also how the way things are sold to us impacts how we see ourselves and others.

Image: Hank Willis Thomas, Are you the Right Kind of Woman for it?, 1974/2007

Champagne wishes and 2 white bitches (I mean it in a nice way lol)

hifructosemag:

Using a collaborative oil painting process, Cara Thayer and Louie Van Patten create artworks that explore the poignant power of the human touch. In these works, hands and fingers are the protagonists — they have the power to make us squirm with discomfort and insecurity or long for a gentle caress. Thayer and Van Patten’s compositions zoom in on various details of the body, presenting a form of intimacy that can be sensual and unsettling at the same time. Take a look at some of their artworks here: http://hifructose.com/2013/01/08/cara-thayer-and-louie-van-pattens-confrontational-paintings-of-intimacy/

Art ya bish!!!
Jan 11

hifructosemag:

Using a collaborative oil painting process, Cara Thayer and Louie Van Patten create artworks that explore the poignant power of the human touch. In these works, hands and fingers are the protagonists — they have the power to make us squirm with discomfort and insecurity or long for a gentle caress. Thayer and Van Patten’s compositions zoom in on various details of the body, presenting a form of intimacy that can be sensual and unsettling at the same time. Take a look at some of their artworks here: http://hifructose.com/2013/01/08/cara-thayer-and-louie-van-pattens-confrontational-paintings-of-intimacy/

Art ya bish!!!

thefader:

faderstyle:

Martine Rose’s liquor collage jacket for F/W 2013, from London’s Mens Collections.

FIVE LONDON MENSWEAR DESIGNERS TO WATCH
Jan 11

thefader:

faderstyle:

Martine Rose’s liquor collage jacket for F/W 2013, from London’s Mens Collections.

FIVE LONDON MENSWEAR DESIGNERS TO WATCH

aintnojigga:

Roc on Roc on Roc.


King Hova
Jan 11

aintnojigga:

Roc on Roc on Roc.

King Hova

(via defjamblr)

Dec 20

debysreturn:

Maurizio Anzeri

…This is just crazy shit!

(via hifructosemag)

Dec 20

actegratuit:

JI YONG HO 

Too fresh! like way too fresh!

(via hifructosemag)

Dec 20

cavetocanvas:

Yinka Shonibare, Gallantry and Criminal Conversation, 2002

From the National Museum of African Art:

Moral values and sexuality have provided Shonibare with rich subject matter, culminating in his vast installation Gallantry and Criminal Conversation. This work is inspired by the phenomenon of the Grand Tour, an extended trip focusing on the art, culture and history of Europe (particularly France and Italy) that was considered central to the education of young ladies and gentlemen in the 17th and early 18th century.

Shonibare’s installation explores the slippages between public and private life, revealing hidden intimacies and exchanges. The Grand Tour is simultaneously revealed as a kind of covert sexual tourism (adultery was called “criminal conversation” at the time) or alternately a coming of age for wealthy young European socialites.

Shonibare’s installation also features a horse-drawn carriage—the typical mode of transport for these young aristocrats before the advent of mass railway travel in the 1840s. The trunks that would have accompanied them on their journey are featured as playful props in Shonibare’s decadent sexual scenario, as is a carefully poised parasol. 

(via blackcontemporaryart)